Percent Planned Complete (PPC) - Calculation Example

Yoda would be the perfect coach for managing schedules on projects: “Do or do not. There is no try.”

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Field Productivity: Percent Planned Complete (PPC). Do or do not. There is no try.

This is the heart of Percent Planned Complete (PPC) and the weekly cycle of continuous production improvement. Measurement of PPC is rigorous:

  • Partially complete tasks DO NOT count.
  • Extra tasks (not planned) DO NOT count.
  • Reasons why DO NOT matter except for the weekly learning aspect. 

Imagine designing a field supervisor coaching program with PPC at the center.  

For 12 weeks, an experienced coach would work hands-on with a Foreman starting with a review of their PPC from the prior week and then developing the next week’s Short-Interval-Plan (SIP), focusing on:  

This coaching will improve the Foreman’s capability to execute their key responsibilities and achieve their key results.  


Field Productivity Workshop


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